mike1baker

Wild Apple Leaf Lyme and Arthritis Relief

About

This is an example of a page. Unlike posts, which are displayed on your blog’s front page in the order they’re published, pages are better suited for more timeless content that you want to be easily accessible, like your About or Contact information. Click the Edit link to make changes to this page or add another page.

22 thoughts on “About

  1. Me, my husband and the twins all contact lyme and co infection from a used babies clothing. I learned from your post that wild apple leafs can treat lyme, please contact us and let us know whether it is crap apple leaf ? and what is the best way and dosage that you ingest it. Thanks you for your kindness. I am currently having eating problem and have to do intravenous amino acid and mineral to sustain life. The twins are only close to 3 year old. Please help.

    May Christ peace be with you.

    Manfred and Josephine and the twins.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I keep trying to reply and it crashes! Read the blog… I will just replay to it there although I am sorry I am late after literally chasing deer here.

      Like

    • By the way, the deer reportedly dig the apple leaves out of the snow to eat in winter. You will see where they dig. Deer have been here at least 30 million years and spirochetes maybe even longer. They had no problems with ticks until all this GMO and weed killer nightmare.

      Like

  2. Hi Mike,

    Are you in Toronto? Could you please send me an email?

    Like

  3. I have to find your email first! Send me one at mvbeng at g mail dawt calm lol

    Like

  4. Mike, we just found your ‘blog’ the other day & have been enjoying your writings very much! Hope you are getting over yesterday’s bug, whatever it was. Keep up the good works!! You are an inspiration to another Lymie here who has walked away from the medical community when they were all out of answers & I’m fighting against all the odds. Regards, A&W

    Like

  5. HI Mike, thank you soooo much for your postings and information. I traveled and lived in developing countries over the last 4 years (South America, Asia, India/middle east) and have some serious gastro issues along with very obvious parasitic symptoms. Your posts make perfect sense and I am covered head to toe in bug bite scars/marks and would love to get rid of these little buggers living and pooping inside me. Now that I’ve returned to the US I’ve been researching cures and the Wild Apple Leaves sound the most promising since other homeopathic methods have only pissed them off and given me worse side effects when they don’t want to leave. Where can I get the powder? Do I chase down a special tree or plant one or can I buy the powder online from a reputable source? Do you have recommendations for brands and also for the pecatin you mentioned as I really don’t care to start smoking but want the help with mucus breakdown. Thank you in advance!

    Like

    • Hi Heather
      They used to sell Pyrus Malus Apple Tree bark on ebay, but they ran out. The best bet is to find an apple tree, but you have to make sure it isn’t sprayed for pests and fungus. That is why I say Wild Apple Leaves. The leaves taste better when dried, and you don’t need very much, like a few leaves a day. I’m not sure where you are from, but check to see if there is an organic orchard around. I took my cue from the deer who kept eating the leaves off the apple trees around here.

      Like

      • Hi Mike,
        Is the Pyrus Malus Apple Tree bark as effective as wild apple leaves? I read that you ate the leaves and chewed the bark – is this for different reasons/conditions. Is your protocol written up here? Is the Pectin to break up biofilm? Sorry so many questions but I want to follow up on this!!
        Thanks for all you do!
        Tricia

        Like

      • The bark is effective like the leaves I suspect, and is better for swelling from what I believe are inflammatory cytokines. The leaves definitely force parasitic nematodes out. I don’t use pectin, butt instead pectin enzyme to try to dissolve bacterial biofilm. Biofilm is made of pectin, coated with an amyloid surface. I have a theory that the bark and leaves must get through that amyloid layer so the pectin enzyme can get to breaking it down. The worry now is that if the bugs have left worms in your neurons, will they damage the nerves more as they drill out or die off from the anthelmintic effect? The damage seemed to already be done in my case before I even tried. Dr Alan MacDonald is on a new thing now where he recognizes the nematodes looking back through autopsy tissue in brain and spinal diseases. https://vimeo.com/166688480 The bark is 5 times as powerful in phloridzin content than the leaves roughly too.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Joe1Smith – for your info and prompt reply!
      I am wondering if you had collagen loss in your skin in areas affected by parasite infection? I am having cognitive effects from Lyme/Parasites – so maybe my neural damage is already done!
      Having difficulty locating apple leaf so I will try the bark with the pectin enzyme – did you see improvement?
      Peace and Healing!
      Tricia

      Like

  6. Thanks for the quick reply! I’m in Northern California so an organic orchard should be nearby. Is there a certain type of apple tree or any Apple leaves will do? Also what brand of pectin enzyme are you using?

    Like

    • I hope that any apple leaves will do. Some people tried crabapple leaves too. Any food grade pectin enzyme, such as used in winemaking to take out the pectin haze from the fruit juice, should work. Winemaking stores have it, as does Ebay for 8.95 a pound plus shipping. I still have about 2/3 of a pound left of BSG Pectin Enzyme for winemaking. I also tried some small 20 gram packets from the local U-Brew wine store. Both kinds worked when they exposed more nematodes actually hiding in poloysaccharide (pectin) biofilm. I started with 2 grams a day in 500 mg. capsules on Day 313. Taking it with 350-1750 mg. a day of apple leaf powder (I tried to find an upper limit) a second wave of nematodes came out. The nematodes are small, under half a mm it is said, but some say the smaller the worm, the worse the disease.

      Like

      • Mike, is the Pectin enzyme sometimes called Pectolase also? Many of the wine makers seem to be discussing Pectolase..is that the same thing, or what do you think?

        Like

      • That sounds like the same thing. Derived from aspergillus niger fungus? It is also used in tequila making to break down Agave polysaccharide to simple sugars, in addition to breaking down pectin haze in wine, clarifying it. Bacterial biofilm is also pectin coated with amyloid. My guess is that the proteolytic enzymes in apple leaves and bark somehow must break through the amyloid layer.

        Like

  7. Excellent information! I can’t thank you enough for posting all this information online!

    Like

  8. Hi Mike, I found Pyrus Malus apple tree bark powder from a company online called Penn Herbs, I received the powder and today I tried it and dissolved one teaspoon in a cup of hot water with some raw honey. It was pretty bitter so will look into purchasing capsules to put it in. I’m unsure on the recommended dosage. Is the equivalent of one teaspoon about right to start? Thanks again

    Like

  9. You also don’t even need a machine, but can just fill the empty capsules one at a time like I did at the start with the first 100 I got from the health food store. I tried some size “00” but they were too big for me. A size 0 holds from 350-450 mg. or so. The machine has a tamper to pack them tighter. A pencil does that easily enough when you fill them by hand.

    Like

  10. Thanks for all the information you’ve posted over the last couple of years. Your independent research will live on for future generations to read. People like you make the internet cool, so stay cool man. All the best.

    Like

  11. Hi, Love all the info you have provided. I have read a lot but still have more to go. Although you mentioned you hoped all types of apple leaves will work could you please tell us exactly which type of apple tree you eat the leaves from. This will give us a starting reference for what is known to work well. Thanks so much.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s